Archive for Italy

Letter from Chilean Insurrectionists to the Informal Anarchist Federation

Posted in Direct Action & Civil Disobedience, Government, Police State, Prisoner Support, Revolution with tags , , , , on January 3, 2011 by Ⓐb Irato

From 325:

Thursday 30 of December of 2010

Collaborative Solidarity

We want to salute the FAI – Revolutionary Group Lambros Foundas, on the recent attacks against the embassies of Chile and Switzerland, in Italy. And with regard to the criticisms made about these actions by the political prisoners of Revolutionary Struggle (Greece), the comrades Pola Rupa, Nikos Maziotis and Kostas Gornas, we say they are within their rights to issue communications and to criticize the actions of other insurrectionalist groups. But we want to say that any civil servant of an embassy of the State of Chile is a political target, and we do not view them as we would another person because they are representatives and protoges of the system and it’s institutions.

Today we indicate that any civil servant of a diplomatic institution, the ambassador of the borders, is a potential target of attack, as a representative of the terror machine which are the nation-states. From here we want to say to the Informal Anarchist Federation – We hope that they get to hear our voices – that we are proud of the federated group called “Brothers in Arms – Nucleus Mauricio Morales/FAI”.

With words and deeds, this is our internationalism. To the dear Mauricio, we took it into our hearts. His death, and of all the revolutionaries fallen in combat, is an eternal call to fight. They will be vindicated by all comrades who send themselves to the joy of the combat, anywhere in the world. Their names and their examples fly freely. They are not the property of anybody.

HONOUR AND GLORY TO THE COMRADE MAURICIO MORALES!

HONOUR AND GLORY TO COMRADE LAMBROS FOUNDAS!

THE FAI LIVES!

From the territory of Chile,

Some Rebels.

This rage is the only future we have!

Posted in Direct Action & Civil Disobedience, Government, Police State, Revolution, Student Movement with tags , , on December 24, 2010 by Ⓐb Irato

Thoughts on 14th December protests in Italy

From Italy Calling:

In the last few days I’ve read, listened to and watched a lot of stuff about the student protests in Italy, and especially the huge demonstrations of 14th December, when Rome was set on fire by thousands of beautiful, angry youth. With few exceptions, the Italian media have been doing what they do best: Attacking, twisting, distorting, diminishing, LYING. No surprise there. I can’t see a reason why the Videocrat and his court would like to have angry people on the streets, unless it was the new generation of Black Shirts they’ve been breeding during the last few years. There have been attacks from other sides too, unfortunately. Roberto Saviano, the writer of the bestseller “Gomorrah” (you’ll have heard of the movie!), wrote a letter to the “left-wing” newspaper La Repubblica, in which he attacked the students using the same old refrain we already know: The police’ violence was horrible, but it was the violent protesters’ fault. A few black sheep ruined the whole peaceful movement, and so on…

Over here, I’ve also read a lot of stuff. Some appalling, some good. I’ve been thinking though: All this brilliant analysis…where does it come from? Where is the students’ voice? Cos this is their moment, their protest, their revolution. With all due respect to the good ones out there, but I don’t really want a journalist or an “intellectual” (do they even exist anymore?) to tell me what’s going on. I want the people who are doing the revolution to tell me what’s going on; I want to hear what they’ve got to say about themselves and what they’re doing.

So…of all the brilliant stuff I found, I decided to translate this article published by the Red Net (Network of Self-managed Universities). There was lots of stuff to choose from, but this one struck a chord with me. I felt these were the voices that I wanted to give space to. No big words, no pretence, no intellectualism. These are the voices of the streets.

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